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Uranus might have two dark moons orbiting the planet

First Posted: Oct 19, 2016 07:05 AM EDT
Voyager 2 picture of Oberon, Uranus' outermost moon.

Voyager 2 picture of Oberon, Uranus' outermost moon.(Photo : Getty Images / Universal History Archive )

It appears that Uranus could have two extra moons hiding in its icy ring; Scientists are on with the Hubble telescope images to search for them. Uranus is the third largest planet in our Solar System and it has 27 moons.

NASA's Voyager 2 Probe has flown past the cold and windy planet in 1986, the data that had been sent back by the probe in 1986 have been re-examined by researchers. Researchers have seen wobbles in Uranus rings which could possibly be two moons as reported by Mail Online.

The two extra moons is believed to be orbiting much closer than any other moon seen before, as mentioned on Science Alert the data shows something strange in two of the thirteen rings of Uranus.

The rings have said to display a wavy pattern which was previously unnoticed; it appears that these wavy patterns are caused due to two tiny moons. Researchers have stated that these moons are very tiny and very dark.

Since these moons do not reflect any light they could have blended into the background of the spacecraft, researchers have also identified that the wavy pattern detected in Uranus's Alpha and Beta rings are very much similar to those caused by the pull of some other moons like Cordelia and Ophelia.

If the existence of these moons is proven it will only measure between 2 to 9 miles across, the discovery is yet to be confirmed as researchers are still in the process.

Since more information is required a team of researchers will inspect Uranus with the Hubble telescope, scientists stated that the Hubble is the best source to identify and confirm the existence of these moons. The possibilities are said to be very high.

If the Hubble fails to in the discovery Uranus would probably get its own orbiter mission, 2016 has proved to be good year for the Solar System and yet there are more discoveries to come. 

 

 

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